Interview with Chris Pang and the evolution of stereotypes: Sponsored post by AAFF

                                                                Interview with Chris Pang and the evolution of stereotypes

  As a society, we learn of stereotypes: the hurtful ways we perceive culture and people.  Black Americans were given hurtful roles as criminals, gangsters, pimps, sycophants, but Asians were given no better  – being portrayed as tiger moms, pianists, martial arts masters, nerds, and sidekicks.  Asian men are stereotyped as unattractive, and media representations of Asians submitting to the white man played a pivotal role in giving such stereotypes power overseas and within the west. Crazy Rich Asians tackle ugly stereotypes that rear their heads in a fine manner. The characters display a hybrid of moments in themselves that goes beyond what we typically see.

                                                            In the name of  Kendrick Lamar 

                                     FUCK YOUR ETHNICITY, NIGGA!.

AmbitiousVariety had the opportunity to interview Chris Pang for the new movie “Crazy Rich Asians”. You don’t need to be crazy nor rich to see the appeal of this movie.  Chirs Pang is a man that should be voted as the most attractive man of 2018.Crazy-rich-asians-6-of-22-300x280 Interview with Chris Pang and the evolution of stereotypes: Sponsored post by AAFF

 

 

 

 

Chris has learned a lot of the years and was drawn to the character Colin. He mentioned that he was a “hybrid within the culture”. An Australian native, and a Taiwanese-Chinese individual, he was raised among harmful stereotypes and he wants others to understand that they are not all that he is.

(Photographed by: Brad Eugene Collins) 

 

Chris was raised by a determined father who is a martial artist, and a mother whose parents tried to unsuccessfully sabotage them. Crazy Rich Asians teach a lesson on how status can really impact the dynamic of your life and others. 

 

We are learning so much from this movie and taking away lessons from it. Even if you are not Asian at all, you should be able to resonate with his film. 

 

Chris goes on to say that “Crazy Rich Asians is an all-star cast of Asian role models”, which hasn’t occurred since “Joy Luck Club” 25 years ago.

  Joy Luck Club is a film that broke stereotypes on what it means to be Chinese-American in the 1990s, what they went through, and how their daughters grew up in San FranciscoCrazy-rich-asians-6-of-22-300x280 Interview with Chris Pang and the evolution of stereotypes: Sponsored post by AAFF

 

 

 

When talking to Chris Pang, I got the feeling that he knew where he stands, and how he understood he is not the guy to tell you about these complex topics. He knows where he stands in life, he knows his job is to act and let people make their decisions based on people who know more about these subjects. He understands that because his father is a martial artist, he was supposed to be that Asian martial artist – since that is what they are known for. He doesn’t disown that part of him, but he knows that his calling is acting. He used his abilities that he learned for the movie ” Crouching Tiger Hidden Dragon 2”, yet he sees it as much more important to have a character be written well within the story.

Crazy-rich-asians-6-of-22-300x280 Interview with Chris Pang and the evolution of stereotypes: Sponsored post by AAFF

 

 

 

 

 

Chris Pang understands what it feels like not to see himself in media and how not seeing his people like himself represented can really impact who you are as an individual.  On Twitter, a Chinese woman getting bullied for her skin tone was inspired by Crazy Rich Asians to be proud of her heritage.Crazy-rich-asians-6-of-22-300x280 Interview with Chris Pang and the evolution of stereotypes: Sponsored post by AAFF

Crazy-rich-asians-6-of-22-300x280 Interview with Chris Pang and the evolution of stereotypes: Sponsored post by AAFF

 

 

 

 

 

 

These individuals along with the actors made a great movie that is making history by crossing the $50Billion mark according to the Atlantic. 

 

Crazy-rich-asians-6-of-22-300x280 Interview with Chris Pang and the evolution of stereotypes: Sponsored post by AAFF

 

 

 

 

While these situations will never go away, learning from them is what Crazy Rich Asians and Black Panther are showing us in an age where inclusivity and representation matter. 

 

Chris Pang knows Crazy Rich Asians will shatter stereotypes not for just Asians, but for Latinos, Black people, Middle Eastern people and more. Crazy Rich Asians are written by Kevin Kwan, directed by Jon M. Chu, written by Adele Lim, and produced by Pete Chiarelli. 

 

   Making this movie not only a surprise but a Mega hit for the representation movement,  Crazy Rich Asians has a sequel already in the making. 

 

What were your thoughts on the movie? Did you learn and understand the teachings of Crazy Rich Asians and truly grasp the significance of what Chris Pang and the other actors of the movie are doing for future inclusion and representation?

 

If you want to follow me and talk, hit me up on twitter and the AmbitiousVariety Youtube channel.

 

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Edited by : Lex the lexicon artist